Lets Talk About Emergency Preparedness  

sexyldy1000 61F  
10465 posts
2/17/2021 12:54 pm
Lets Talk About Emergency Preparedness



In the event of a major disaster, experience has shown us that it will likely take three or more days for emergency services such as police, fire, ambulance, and other outside assistance to reach many neighbourhoods. the services we most take for granted (gas, electricity, water and phone) may be disrupted for days. No community is without risk

Emergencies and natural disasters are usually unpredictable. A little preparation could mean the difference between life and death during those times. With all that has happened the past year and throughout this winter, I felt it was appropriate t.o share these suggestions for how t.o be ready:

Outlet-free Chargers
Smartphones and laptops will still work when the power is out—as long as you’re prepared. Having a juiced-up portable battery or small generator will keep you in touch with loved ones and with any emergency updates.

Cordless Radio
Gathering around the radio might seem like a thing of the past, but it could prove vital in an emergency situation. It allows you t.o get in touch with what’s going on locally. You won’t miss any important messages warning you not t.o leave—or t.o get out fast. Make sure you have a battery-powered or hand-cranked radio so it can work when the power is out.

Medications
Sometimes, the way medications are dispersed now, we have just a very small supply available. In a disaster, it might be hard to replenish those supplies. Talk to your doctor about writing a larger prescription so you have a couple of weeks work on hand if you can’t reach the pharmacy.

Lantern
Handheld flashlights are convenient t.o carry and store, but their beams won’t light up a room the way your lamps do. In addition t.o battery-powered flashlights, pick up a lantern, which can brighten up a larger amount of space.

Batteries
If you’ve been using your phone as a flashlight and haven’t touched an actual torch in years, don’t be surprised if the batteries in your backups have worn out or corroded. A pack of extra batteries never hurts.

Non-perishable Food
Stocking up on food is a no-brainer if you know you won’t be able t.o get t.o a grocery store, but you might be surprised by just how much food t.o keep on hand. The Red Cross recommends keeping two weeks worth of food available in case you’re unexpectedly stuck at home, or enough t.o last three days if you’re evacuating. Get creative and stick with foods you actually want t.o eat.

Pet Food
Don’t forget your furry friends when you’re stocking up on food. Keep at least two weeks' worth of dry food on hand so your pets can stay healthy and safe.

Extra Propane
If your home’s electricity or gas isn’t working, the oven and microwave would be out of the question. Keep extra propane on hand so you can fire up a BBQ or camping stove.

Water
H2O seems like a given, but if anything goes wrong with your local water system, you’ll need t.o have a backup. As a rule of thumb, make sure you have a gallon per person per day, ideally enough to last two weeks. If you don’t want t.o leave jugs of water sitting around all the time, fill clean, empty soda bottles or a large water dispenser when there’s a storm coming.

Cash
Don’t assume you can rely on plastic during an emergency. Card readers might not work, and ATMs could run out of money during a natural disaster, so keeping backup bills on hand could be a lifesaver. Talk to your family about how much you can afford to keep out of the bank and where the safest place in your home for it is.

Tool Kit
Even if you’re not used to making your own repairs, a toolbox could be a vital resource during an emergency situation. A basic toolkit with items such as a wrench, screwdrivers, and a hammer can help you fight back when your home and supplies are under stress.

Copies of Important Documents
It’s always a good idea to keep original copies of important documents like homeownership papers or insurance information, but keep a backup on hand too. Leave hard copies in a safe space (away from the originals), or save them digitally in a password-protected file in the cloud.

First-Aid Kit
A well-stocked first-aid kit is critically important. The Red Cross recommends keeping bandages, an instant ice pack, antiseptic wipes, scissors, and more.

Just-for-fun Items
When you’re rushing t.o pack your bags for an evacuation, a few non-essentials can actually be some of the best things for your mental well-being. Pack a book, a ’s favourite stuffed animal, or playing cards. Letting yourself relax a bit will help normalize the situation and take your mind off the stress.

How prepared are you t.o handle an emergency or natural disaster?




@ Reader's Digest and St. John Ambulance

sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/17/2021 1:02 pm

In "2013", my city had record-breaking rainfall that resulted in widespread flooding damage and power outages. I was without power for a full week and without hot water for two weeks. I lost my roof and my basement. It was an eye-opener for just how unprepared I was.


Tmptrzz 59F  
106362 posts
2/17/2021 1:19 pm

Thank you so much for sharing such an important blog with us today. I can say I need to do all of these but I don't always do this and I really should as I do have a medical bag ready for the hubby at all times.

I did know about all of these except for the first one about outlet-free chargers, I didn't even know they made those, so I appreciate you sharing such important information about all the things we should be prepared for in case of emergency.

The weather has made such emergencies this week, and I hope everyone is safe and sound.

I hope you enjoy a wonderful Hump Day..

Seduce the mind and see what a wonderful adventure the body will take you on..


nekkedcouple 61M/55F  
85 posts
2/17/2021 1:38 pm

We have been through several major disasters. So, our first advice would be don't live near us! Everything else sexyldy1000 wrote is accurate. We have food and supplies saved up to last a few weeks. We have several propane tanks and a propane generator. Gas goes bad so we use propane. our generator can run our fridge and a few space heaters. And a laptop so we can still get nekked on cam!


Paulxx001 64M  
22487 posts
2/17/2021 1:43 pm

Thanks for the tips. They're always useful and worthy.

... is there another way to look at it
Going Too Fucking Far NEW Blog Features RevealeD O O


redrockrascal 63M
23541 posts
2/17/2021 1:48 pm

Re Generators. They need to be started occasionally and drained of fuel if not used regularly.

Re Batteries. Keep various sizes of rechargeable batteries on a solar charger.

When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.

The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.


mechanictim 59M
27 posts
2/17/2021 5:26 pm

It is always good to be reminded to prepare for an emergency. I'll add a little to the list.
First is if you have more than one person in the house, do a drill for an evacuation of the house. Because if you tell people where to meet when the house is on fire there will allways be that one who when told to go across the street and wait by the tree across from the front door will intepret that as go around the house to the yard shed. Don't risk a firefighters life looking for someone in a burning building when that person is in the wrong place because they don't follow directions...Do a drill, every year at least.
Second is if you buy something to add to an emergency kit, learn how to use it before there is an emergency. Got a camp stove to cook on but don't camp, take it out of the box and use it a few times. I have seen people struggle with something as simple as a bic lighter because they never used one before. Also don't forget the safety instructions, don't run engines in enclosed spaces, don't try to heat you house with a gas stove. Carbon monoxide is a silent killer and has claimed some lives just recently in Texas from people running a car to warm up while in a closed garage.
Third having a first aid kit is good but actually taking a first aid course is even better. Taking the course again every two years is even better.
And last, store battery operated devices with the batteries removed. Most flashlights stored in cars are just storage devices for dead corroded batteries.


p1947q 75M  
139 posts
2/17/2021 5:55 pm

For outlet free charging I have two rechargeable batteries that I can recharge with a small solar panel. Takes a couple of hours to recharge but each on will charge a smart phone three times before needing recharged. In my younger days did some tent camping and still have tent, sleeping bag, lanterns, batteries, small first aid kit (I actually use this regularly and restock it periodically) small tool kit, portable generator and if I don't have to evacuate, a whole house generator with a propane tank that will suffice two weeks if I don't let it get below one-quarter full


resant78 43M  
3325 posts
2/17/2021 10:20 pm

I am reminded of how unprepared I am. And I know how important all of those items are.

I do have at least two decks of cards.


WyoCowboy7751 68M
2486 posts
2/18/2021 5:39 am

I'm a Volunteer with three different groups that deal with this sort of stuff ( one County level & two at State level ) !!! ready.gov is an excellent site for information !!!


Kalbi54 67M
1401 posts
2/18/2021 7:43 am

or you can be like one senator and simply jet himself and family to Cancun


sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/18/2021 8:32 am

    Quoting Tmptrzz:
    Thank you so much for sharing such an important blog with us today. I can say I need to do all of these but I don't always do this and I really should as I do have a medical bag ready for the hubby at all times.

    I did know about all of these except for the first one about outlet-free chargers, I didn't even know they made those, so I appreciate you sharing such important information about all the things we should be prepared for in case of emergency.

    The weather has made such emergencies this week, and I hope everyone is safe and sound.

    I hope you enjoy a wonderful Hump Day..
I felt this was a timely reminder. Emergencies can and do occur at any time and often when least expected. My thoughts are with all those struggling with the loss of power, water and necessities of life. Please look after yourself.


sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/18/2021 8:34 am

    Quoting nekkedcouple:
    We have been through several major disasters. So, our first advice would be don't live near us! Everything else sexyldy1000 wrote is accurate. We have food and supplies saved up to last a few weeks. We have several propane tanks and a propane generator. Gas goes bad so we use propane. our generator can run our fridge and a few space heaters. And a laptop so we can still get nekked on cam!
You must be strong and resilient people to come out of those intact! Sounds like you are well-equipped and prioritized the necessities . Thank you for stopping by and sharing your thoughts.


sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/18/2021 8:34 am

    Quoting Paulxx001:
    Thanks for the tips. They're always useful and worthy.
Yes, that's why I posted this.


sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/18/2021 8:35 am

    Quoting redrockrascal:
    Re Generators. They need to be started occasionally and drained of fuel if not used regularly.

    Re Batteries. Keep various sizes of rechargeable batteries on a solar charger.
Thanks for the additional suggestions!


sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/18/2021 8:38 am

    Quoting mechanictim:
    It is always good to be reminded to prepare for an emergency. I'll add a little to the list.
    First is if you have more than one person in the house, do a drill for an evacuation of the house. Because if you tell people where to meet when the house is on fire there will allways be that one who when told to go across the street and wait by the tree across from the front door will intepret that as go around the house to the yard shed. Don't risk a firefighters life looking for someone in a burning building when that person is in the wrong place because they don't follow directions...Do a drill, every year at least.
    Second is if you buy something to add to an emergency kit, learn how to use it before there is an emergency. Got a camp stove to cook on but don't camp, take it out of the box and use it a few times. I have seen people struggle with something as simple as a bic lighter because they never used one before. Also don't forget the safety instructions, don't run engines in enclosed spaces, don't try to heat you house with a gas stove. Carbon monoxide is a silent killer and has claimed some lives just recently in Texas from people running a car to warm up while in a closed garage.
    Third having a first aid kit is good but actually taking a first aid course is even better. Taking the course again every two years is even better.
    And last, store battery operated devices with the batteries removed. Most flashlights stored in cars are just storage devices for dead corroded batteries.
Thank you for stopping by and sharing those suggestions. Often people think they know what to do until they are actually placed in a situation where they have to react. It's easy to have an "it will never happen to me' attitude" and then panic when you are. Knowledge is invaluable.


sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/18/2021 8:40 am

    Quoting p1947q:
    For outlet free charging I have two rechargeable batteries that I can recharge with a small solar panel. Takes a couple of hours to recharge but each on will charge a smart phone three times before needing recharged. In my younger days did some tent camping and still have tent, sleeping bag, lanterns, batteries, small first aid kit (I actually use this regularly and restock it periodically) small tool kit, portable generator and if I don't have to evacuate, a whole house generator with a propane tank that will suffice two weeks if I don't let it get below one-quarter full
Wow! You are certainly prepared which is great to hear. Checking and replenishing emergency supplies is important. It's something we should all have and hope to never have to use. Continue to keep safe!


sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/18/2021 8:41 am

    Quoting resant78:
    I am reminded of how unprepared I am. And I know how important all of those items are.

    I do have at least two decks of cards.
Perhaps this will nudge you to put together an emergency kit. Decks of cards won't keep you warm, fed or hydrated. Safety should always be first priority!


sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/18/2021 8:44 am

    Quoting WyoCowboy7751:
    I'm a Volunteer with three different groups that deal with this sort of stuff ( one County level & two at State level ) !!! ready.gov is an excellent site for information !!!
Thank you for sharing. There are lots of great information available. I have worked on different health and safety committees, done served on a coroner's inquest for a high-rise fire that killed 6 people and done disaster receiver planning at the corporate level. I have learned so much and take nothing for granted.


sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/18/2021 8:45 am

    Quoting Kalbi54:
    or you can be like one senator and simply jet himself and family to Cancun
I just heard about that and shaking my head. Takes all kinds doesn't it?


HermanG67 54M
8464 posts
2/18/2021 9:29 am

Living in Rural Canada most of the services that run a household are mine to maintain, so I have an additional level of preparedness in that I have spare parts and supplies.

it is important to be safe during outages
BBQ and gas stoves burning indoors can produce Carbon Monoxide, and are not recommended for inside use, if they MUST be used ensure proper ventalation

Generators are handy, but run them outside and bring the power cord in.

Candles are good to keep on hand for light and they produce a small amount of heat as well


SingleInGR 54M
360 posts
2/18/2021 9:36 am

That list is a great preparedness guide to things we all should think about and have with us just incase.

I have all of that and more ready 24 - 7 and am also a house that all the neighbors know they can come to in a disaster as I have a lot of extra stuff.

My camper is also loaded with lots of stuff plus solar power so off grid ready.

I can probably survive a disaster without assistance ( minus a direct hit to my house ) for up to 3 months depending upon what I use or if I have others here.

I dont think enough people really plan for a disaster and really, one can come at any time ... look at Texas, who would have thought? For sure not those that should have been in the energy sectors.

I agree with Wyocowboy7751, Ready.gov is a great site.

I hope that those that might have learned something new from this post do start a preparedness plan and gather some items, you dont have to be a full out prepper and make a missile silo to live in but thinking what if never hurts.

THANK YOU for the wonderful and informative blog post today.

I hope you all stay safe and prepared.


sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/18/2021 11:09 am

    Quoting HermanG67:
    Living in Rural Canada most of the services that run a household are mine to maintain, so I have an additional level of preparedness in that I have spare parts and supplies.

    it is important to be safe during outages
    BBQ and gas stoves burning indoors can produce Carbon Monoxide, and are not recommended for inside use, if they MUST be used ensure proper ventalation

    Generators are handy, but run them outside and bring the power cord in.

    Candles are good to keep on hand for light and they produce a small amount of heat as well
My experience is only in urban settings but realize the rural requirements for emergency preparedness are quite different. One of the other fundamentals that people living in high-rise buildings need to do is to make sure there is a Fire Safety Plan and that anyone with special needs is included in those needing assistance for evacuation.
I would caution about the use of candles as too often, they are left unattended or can be knocked over if not properly secured. Thank you for stopping by and sharing your suggestions.


sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/18/2021 11:22 am

    Quoting SingleInGR:
    That list is a great preparedness guide to things we all should think about and have with us just incase.

    I have all of that and more ready 24 - 7 and am also a house that all the neighbors know they can come to in a disaster as I have a lot of extra stuff.

    My camper is also loaded with lots of stuff plus solar power so off grid ready.

    I can probably survive a disaster without assistance ( minus a direct hit to my house ) for up to 3 months depending upon what I use or if I have others here.

    I dont think enough people really plan for a disaster and really, one can come at any time ... look at Texas, who would have thought? For sure not those that should have been in the energy sectors.

    I agree with Wyocowboy7751, Ready.gov is a great site.

    I hope that those that might have learned something new from this post do start a preparedness plan and gather some items, you dont have to be a full out prepper and make a missile silo to live in but thinking what if never hurts.

    THANK YOU for the wonderful and informative blog post today.

    I hope you all stay safe and prepared.


Wow! You should be teaching courses on this subject!
When the 'big storm' hit here, at my end of the street, there were five properties in a row that were hit the hardest and we all lost our basements. My next-door neighbours were in their 80s, so I did a lot to help them until their family members could pitch in. Some great online resources here are St. John Ambulance, the Red Cross and Canada.ca. Thank you for stopping by and sharing your information. I echo your wishes that everyone stays safe and prepared.


pocogato12 69F  
37204 posts
2/19/2021 9:34 am

Excellent post!!!! Living in New England we know what is warranted but when I had to deal with an entire hotel during Hurricane BOB I really learned what was necessary 9 no cell phones then ) and I never forgot

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sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/19/2021 11:09 am

    Quoting pocogato12:
    Excellent post!!!! Living in New England we know what is warranted but when I had to deal with an entire hotel during Hurricane BOB I really learned what was necessary 9 no cell phones then ) and I never forgot
I think you are right. Folks that live in certain areas seem to have a stronger awareness and can be prepared for almost anything. It's also easy to become complacent and think, 'it will never happen here'. One of my challenges is always keeping my cell phone charged. I have a landline too but I lose it when the power is out. Experience gives us wisdom!


trixietrixster 54F  
3121 posts
2/25/2021 12:34 pm

We keep stock of some of these items, and, also have a solar radio. Hadn't even thought of water or a first aid kit!! Need to work on these ...

In Luv, Lite, Laffter ...


sexyldy1000 61F  
9578 posts
2/25/2021 1:12 pm

    Quoting trixietrixster:
    We keep stock of some of these items, and, also have a solar radio. Hadn't even thought of water or a first aid kit!! Need to work on these ...
Great to hear you have thought about it. The stock also needs to be reviewed and replaced. It's like insurance...you need to have it and hope to never need it.


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